Creative Commons License


« December 2004 | Main | February 2005 »

FRAUD ALERT: Work-at-home, check cashing scams

We are getting swamped in reports about check cashing and work-at-home scams. Here's an example of the email solicitation they use to people who post their resume on Careerbuilder and other job boards. (The job boards continue to aid and abet international crime rings. )

Hello,

Rilan Soft LABS - one of the largest developers of the Unix-based software in the East Europe. Company is the winner of prizes of the exhibition Neo Tech 2004, our production is widely known in the countries of Euro Union. Now, we advance our production on the American market and you have an opportunity join one of the most successful and fastest growing companies in the manufacture of custom software.

Our basic office is located in Moscow (Russia), also we have branches in the countries of the East Europe, such as Ukraine, Belarus and Poland, in the near future we open representation in Germany. As a result of the USA market research we are convinced that our products have good sales potential, but after we have made approach to sell our programs in USA, we regret to find that we can't receive payments. Most of our clients prefer payment orders through PayPal payment system. The job we offer you requires receiving payments from our clients on your PayPal account. Your salary will make the % from the sum of the payments acting on your account.

We reviewed your resume closely and considered you as a possible candidate for the job. Work consists in receiving payments from our clients in USA for software we sell. For receiving payments you should have confirmed PayPal account registered with. At present time we have quite big amount of potential clients in purchasing our products. So, first sales are expected to be in the nearest future. Once you receive payment, you should withdraw it from your account and inform us. After that, send amount in cash to our manager in Russia using Western Union service. Your compensation will consist in percent of payment's sum which you keep from the receiving money. Your earnings depends on the sum of payment you receive, we offer the following terms of contract:

the Sum of payment, USD your compensation, from the sum

up to 200 25% (up to 50 USD); from 200 up to 500 20% (from 40 up to 100 USD); from 500 up to 1000 16% (from 80 up to 160 USD); from 1000 up to 1500 13% (from 130 up to 195 USD);from 1500 10% (from 150 USD)

As a result of the USA market research we convinced that our products have good sales potential. We assume that your earnings in the first month will make about 1000 USD, however we also assume that the quantity of sales the nearest half-year will increase, and accordingly your earnings will increase also. If you accept the offered conditions please send your e-mail, or fax number, which we will use to send you copy of labor contract.

All information concerning your resume has been taken from materials of a site careerbuilder.com

Sincerely, Alex Eftimov

Rilan Soft LABS a_rilansoft@juno.com

 

Please report any contact from such fraudsters or crime of this kind. See this web page on ScamSafe.com on how to do so:

http://www.scamsafe.com/scamsafe/2004/06/reporting_check.html

 

Category: FRAUD ALERTS
Posted on January 30, 2005 at 11:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (103) | TrackBack

FRAUD ALERT: E-Z Checkcash

Check cashing schemes keep popping up. This from D. Hambrice, who is still on the trail of the check cashing frausters...

www.cashers1.biz, is a stolen and forged check ring with ties to Russia and are being sought aggressively by the FBI. Evidence of their damage may be seen on www.scam.com, www.ripoffreport.com and www.scamsafe.com in the name E-Z CheckCASH. They have also stolen the identity of a legitimate business in the SeaTac, WA area.

Category: FRAUD ALERTS
Posted on January 23, 2005 at 09:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | TrackBack

Web scam victimizes Alaskans

'NIGERIAN' SCHEME: Shysters ask for help cashing fake money orders. Investigators say that a new version of an old scam has appeared in Alaska and are warning people not to fall for the latest incarnation of the venerable "Nigerian" Internet money scheme,

From Anchorage Daily News

Category: ID Theft News
Posted on January 22, 2005 at 10:52 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Identity Theft Looms Over UNC with Lost Hard Drive

(PRWEB) January 22, 2005 -- More than 15,500 students and staff at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) may be in jeopardy of identity theft after a university computer hard drive containing confidential personal and financial information was announced to be missing by UNC President Kay Norton on Thursday, Jan 20 2005.

Category: ID Theft News
Posted on January 22, 2005 at 10:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Investment Fraud tips

Investment Fraud tips:

  • If an investment firm claims it can double your money (or more) in a short time, it is a scam.
  • You should never give cash to someone for an investment. Reputable businesses want you to have records of your transactions.
  • If you are told that there is a rumor about two companies planning to merge so now is the time to purchase lots of stock in these companies, go to a reputable source and find out if there is any truth to this information.
  • When making an investment, always have a knowledgeable third party look over the information.
  • Never accept a verbal contract.
  • Always check an investment firm's track record. In CA, call the Department of Corporation's toll-free number (866) ASK-CORP (275-2677), between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Or go to www.corp.ca.gov

Category: Consumer Tips
Posted on January 22, 2005 at 10:47 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

FRAUD ALERT: Beware of Tsumani scams & viruses

A mass e-mail posing as a plea for aid to help the victims of last month's Asian tsunami disaster is actually a vehicle for spreading a computer virus

And there have been a number of mass e-mails sent out in an attempt to steal money, many of them versions of the so-called Nigerian Letter scam, to which readers are invited to reply with their details, apparently in order to help transfer large sums of money and receive a cut themselves.

Category: FRAUD ALERTS
Posted on January 17, 2005 at 11:46 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack