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Facebook pushes back against employers demanding passwords

Is it legal or even fair for prospective employers to request -- or in some cases demand -- your Facebook password?

Facebook, perhaps anxious to avoid public controversy as it prepares for a much-publicized initial public offering, is moving to squelch a widely reported practice of employers asking job applicants for their Facebook passwords.

“If you are a Facebook user, you should never have to share your password, let anyone access your account, or do anything that might jeopardize the security of your account or violate the privacy of your friends,” Erin Egan, Facebook’s chief privacy officer, wrote in a March 23 note. “As a user, you shouldn’t be forced to share your private information and communications just to get a job.”

Egan also hinted at the legal repercussions: “If an employer sees on Facebook that someone is a member of a protected group [e.g., over a certain age, etc.], that employer may open themselves up to claims of discrimination if they don’t hire that person.”

Employers also may not “have the proper policies and training for reviewers to handle private information,” Egan added. “If they don’t—and actually, even if they do—the employer may assume liability for the protection of the information they have seen.” That information may also incur certain responsibilities, such as reporting the possible commission of a crime.

EWeek

Category: Identity Theft News
Posted on March 25, 2012 at 03:23 PM | Permalink